Skip to content Skip to navigation

Post Doctoral

profile image placeholder

Josh Brahinsky is currently conducting fieldwork in California. He is a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Anthropology at Stanford University.  His studies have led him from a small town in central New Jersey to an undergraduate program at Oberlin College and then a PhD at UCSC’s History of Consciousness Department.  Working between multiple disciplines, he now explores the ways people form themselves, co-create each other, and face and build power. He organizes unions and study how evangelicals organize themselves.  In particular, he has been spending time among Pentecostal missionary trainees as they learn to teach the skills of evangelism, trance, prayer, and community.  This has led him to explore sensory cultivation, affect and the globalization of capitalist modernity.  He is currently working on a monograph titled Gods Bodies: Pentecostals, Capitalism and the Art of Immediacy.  Here at Stanford he hopes to contribute to the evolution of something akin to a comparative vision of psychologically informed anthropology.

profile image placeholder
profile image placeholder

John Dulin is currently conducting fieldwork in Ghana. He is a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Anthropology at Stanford University. He received his PhD from UC San Diego in August of 2016. His dissertation titled “Intelligible Tolerance, Ambiguous Tensions, and Antagonistic Revelations: Patterns of Muslim-Christian Coexistence in Orthodox Ethiopia” was based on 20 months of field work in the Amhara region in northwest Ethiopia. John looked at how Muslims and Christians get along on a daily basis despite tensions arising from major changes on the religious landscape, in particular the proliferation of visible mosques in urban spaces that use to be uniformly Christian.

profile image placeholder
profile image placeholder
Emily Ng's profile image

Emily Ng is a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Anthropology at Stanford University. Her interests pivot around themes of religiosity, madness and mental health, and conceptions of time and the person. Her current work with the Spiritual Curiosity project focuses on perceptions of the otherworldly across charismatic Christianity and various strands of Buddhism in urban and rural China. Her previous project addressed spirit mediumship, psychiatry, and post-Mao cosmologies in Henan province, and the significance of spiritual-psychiatric affliction amid labor outmigration and histories of anti-colonial struggle. She has also conducted research on intergenerational transformations in experiences of mania and depression in Shenzhen, paralleling a conceptual shift from the centrality of the state to that of the self since market reforms. Inspired by psychological and medical anthropology, critical theory, and phenomenological psychiatry, her work aims to grapple with the profound dilemmas that give shape to contemporary experiences. She received her PhD in Medical Anthropology from the University of California, Berkeley.

profile image placeholder

Rachel E. Smith is currently conducting fieldwork in Vanuatu, in the southwest Pacific. She is a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Anthropology at Stanford University. She has so far been conducting research in Port Vila (Vanuatu’s capital) with Presbyterian Church of Vanuatu, and New Covenant Church – a new charismatic church with a distinctly Ni-Vanuatu identity. She has also recently begun research with a rural village in south Pentecost island that is known for historically resisting Christianity and maintaining many aspects of local indigenous beliefs and practices, or ‘kastom’. Rachel obtained a PhD in Social Anthropology at University of Manchester, UK, in May 2016. Her PhD thesis was based on sixteen months’ ethnographic fieldwork in Lamen Island and Lamen Bay, Epi in central Vanuatu, a rural community with a high degree of engagement in New Zealand and Australia’s Pacific seasonal worker programs. The thesis examined Li-Lamenu people’s moral reasoning about their motivations for working overseas, and the intended and unintended consequences in terms of socio-economic change. Her doctoral research was part of a wider ESRC (UK) funded project, “Domestic Moral Economy: an ethnographic study of value in Asia-Pacific’, led by Karen Sykes (Manchester), Chris Gregory (Australian National University) and Fiona Magowan (Queens Belfast), which drew together research across several countries in Asia-Pacific region.