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Sylvia Yanagisako

Sylvia Yanagisako's profile photo

Sylvia Yanagisako

Edward Clark Crossett Professor of Humanistic Studies
Ph.D. Washington, 1975
Research Interests: 
Anthropology of capitalism, transnationalism, social and cultural theory, feminist theory. U.S., Italy.

About

Sylvia Yanagisako is the Edward Clark Crossett Professor of Humanistic Studies and Professor and Chair of the Department of Anthropology. Her research and publications have focused on the cultural processes through which kinship, gender, capitalism, and work have been forged in Italy and the U.S. She has also written about the orthodox configuration of the discipline of anthropology in the U.S. and considered alternatives to it (Unwrapping the Sacred Bundle: Reflections on the Disciplining of Anthropology, 2005).

Professor Yanagisako is currently writing a collaborative ethnography with Lisa Rofel on the transnational business relations forged by Italian and Chinese textile and garment manufacturers. This book builds on her monograph (Producing Culture and Capital, 2002) which examined the cultural processes through which a technologically-advanced, Italian manufacturing industry was produced.

Professor Yanagisako has served as President of the Society for Cultural Anthropology, Chair of the Department of Cultural and Social Anthropology at Stanford, and Chair of the Program in Feminist Studies at Stanford. She received the Dean's Award for Distinguished Teaching in 1992.

 

Selected Articles

2007   "Bringing It All Back Home: Kinship Theory in Anthropology." In: Kinship in Europe: Approaches to the Long Term Development (1300-1900), edited by David Sabean, Simon Teuscher, and Jon Mathiew. New York: Berghahn Books.

2012   "Immaterial and Industrial Labor: on false binaries in Hardt and Negri's Trilogy." Focaal: Journal of Global and Historical Anthropology, volume 64: 16-23. special section, edited by Ara Wilson.

2013   "Transnational Family Capitalism: Producing ‘Made in Italy’ in China.” In: Vital Relations: Modernity and the Persistent Life of Kinship, edited by Susan McKinnon and Fenella Cannell. Santa Fe: SAR Press. Pp. 63-84.