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Allison Kendra

Allison Kendra

Dissertation Writer
Research Interests: 
US Empire, critical studies of race and gender, everyday forms of war, embodied labor, decoloniality, the Americas

About

I am a sociocultural anthropologist of drug war militarism, development, and social inequality in the Americas. Theoretically and methodologically, my work is based in anthropology’s intersection with decolonial, feminist, and critical race studies. In my research and teaching, I critically examine how state and international interventions are deployed in the war on drugs, their impacts on people’s everyday lives, and their roles in shaping racialized and gendered inequalities. My dissertation examines how US-supported war and intervention are governed, maintained, and experienced in Peru’s Huallaga Valley, where for decades the governments of the United States and Peru have conducted militarized and development-based interventions in the name of the war on drugs and war on terror.  
 
I am currently a Mellon Foundation Dissertation Fellow at the School of Humanities and Sciences. In 2019-2020, I was a Graduate Teaching Fellow at the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity, where I developed and taught the course Race and the War on Drugs: Long Roots and Other Futures. In this course, we examined how drug policies have furthered racialized and gendered oppression from colonialism through to present systems of mass incarceration and border imperialism and explored critical calls towards abolitionist and decolonial alternatives. My work as a feminist scholar and teacher builds on my experiences in experiential education, critical community engagement, and political organizing.