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From Garden Warriors to Good Seeds: Defining and Enacting Food Sovereignty in Native American Communities

From Garden Warriors to Good Seeds: Defining and Enacting Food Sovereignty in Native American Communities

Elizabeth Hoover
Stanford Humanities Center External Faculty Fellow, Manning Assistant Professor of American Studies, Brown University
Date and Time: 
Monday, April 8, 2019 - 15:30
Location: 

Department of Anthropology
Main Quad - Building 50
Room 51A (Colloquium Room)

Abstract: 

This talk explores how food sovereignty as a concept and method is being described, defined, and enacted by Native American farmers and gardeners across the US, and how these definitions are being operationalized in the broader goals of promoting community health and the reclamation and maintenance of tribal culture. Drawing on a decade spent volunteering with and conducting interviews with Indigenous farming projects and Native American chefs across the United States; meetings with members of Indigenous seed keeping alliances and heritage seed restoration projects; and my experiences as a board member of the Native American Food Sovereignty Alliance, this talk expands the discussion around food and seed sovereignty to include the contributions of Native chefs, seed keepers, and anti-extractive protest movements.

Bio: 

Elizabeth Hoover is an External Faculty Fellow at Stanford Humanities Center.  She is also Manning Assistant Professor of American Studies at Brown University, and teaches courses on environmental health and justice in Native communities, indigenous food movements, Native American museum curation, and community engaged research.